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Registration applications

Registration and participant selection is now complete.

The main site and repository for Astro Hack Week 2019 is now located on GitHub Wiki here

For further information about Astro Hack Week, please visit http://astrohackweek.org/2019/

The 2019 edition will be held at the Kavli Institute for Cosmology at Cambridge University (Cambridge, UK), from August 26 to August 30, 2019. All scientists,
including graduate students, senior undergraduates, faculty, postdocs, as
well as anyone whose work relates to astronomy outside academia, are
invited to apply to attend.

Due to the interactive nature of the workshop and our space constraints, attendance is capped at approximately 50 people. Astro Hack Week is a
mixture of data analysis summer school and unconference-enabled
collaborative research. There are no formal prerequisites.

Participants will learn the theoretical foundation of, and practical
knowledge in, statistical and machine learning methods crucial to modern
astronomical data analysis. We welcome participants to bring their own
research projects with them; Astro Hack Week is a great place to apply new
skills and methods, and work with others to move these projects forward. It
is also an opportunity to work on something new, and we encourage
participants to apply their technical knowledge to outstanding problems in
the astronomical community.

Please email us if you have any questions or concerns: astrohackweek@gmail.com

Sincerely, the Astro Hack Week organizing committee:

Ellianna Abrahams

Lauren Anderson

Nicolas Angelides

Steven Brereton,

James Fergusson

William Handley

Daniela Huppenkothen

Andrei Igoshev

Gábor Kovács

Boris Leistedt

Kaisey Mandel

Brigitta Sipőcz

Jake Vanderplas

Nicholas Walton

KICC Annual Report 2019

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