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Stephen Hawking, 8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018

last modified Apr 17, 2018 12:32 PM

On 14th March 2018 Professor Stephen Hawking died peacefully
at his home in Cambridge at the age of 76.

Stephen Hawking is widely recognised as one of the most influential theoretical physicists in modern times. He has made seminal contributions to several areas of astrophysics. In particular, his studies have provided some of the pillars of our understanding of black holes, including the concept that black holes must have a temperature and must generate radiation (known as Hawking radiation). More broadly, his studies have resulted in major fundamental advances in areas of cosmology and general relativity.

He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge (the same chair held by Isaac Newton) from 1979 to 2009. In 2007 he founded the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology, of which he was Director of Research until 2014 and then he was the Dennis Stanton Avery and Sally Tsui Wong-Avery Director of Research. He received many awards and honours, including the Hughes and Copley Medals of the Royal Society, the US Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the Fundamental Physics prize.

Stephen Hawking wrote milestone research papers and well known scientific books. He also wrote several popular science books, such as the famous "A Brief History of Time".

Within the context of the Kavli Institute, Stephen supported the creation of the Institute and most recently has helped us to expand our research in Gravitational Waves, an area in which he has been a pioneer.

Stephen was a source of inspiration for all of us and we will greatly miss him.

Stephen Hawking (centre), together with Roberto Maiolino (Director of the Kavli Institute, left) and members of the Kavli Foundation Board of Directors and Staff during their visit in November 2017.

KICC Annual Report 2018

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