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Gravitational Waves

gw

Gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy is an emerging branch of observational astronomy which aims to use gravitational waves to collect observational data about objects such as neutron stars and black holes, events such as supernovae, and processes including those of the early universe shortly after the Big Bang.

KICC researchers are involved in the Advanced LIGO experiment, which has recently achieved the first direct detection of gravitational waves. Activities focus on theoretical work aimed at predicting the GW signal from the various classes of sources and on developing the statistical tools for the detection and analysis of GW experiments (such as LIGO).

We are contributing through statistical analysis of the LIGO GW signals.

Additional activities in the area of GW are, both within KICC and more broadly in Cambridge are:

  • Simulations of supermassive black holes mergers and expectations for LISA.
  • Prediction and search of gravitational waves associated with supermassive black hole mergers through the Pulsar Timing Array.
  • Search for primordial gravitational waves through CMB B-modes polarization.
  • Search and analysis of gravitational waves electromagnetic counterparts.

Current Kavli based researchers involved in this area are:

Researchers previously based in this Kavli group:

  • Lindley Lentati

 

KICC Annual Report 2019

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Massive galaxies were already much more mature in the early universe than previously expected. This was shown by an international team of astronomers—including researchers from the Kavli Institute for Cosmology (KICC) and the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) — who studied 118 distant galaxies with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2020

Oct 06, 2020

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2020 has been awarded to Roger Penrose, Reinhard Genzel, and Andrea Ghez, for their discoveries about one of the most exotic phenomena in the universe: the black hole.

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