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LIGO and Virgo make first detection of gravitational waves produced by colliding neutron stars

last modified Nov 07, 2017 02:13 PM

crop3_NSIllustration__CREDIT__NSF_LIGO_Sonoma_State_University_A._Simonnet.jpg

For the first time, scientists have directly detected gravitational waves — ripples in space-time — in addition to light from the spectacular collision of two neutron stars. This marks the first time that a cosmic event has been viewed in both gravitational waves and light.

The discovery was made using the U.S.-based Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO); the Europe-based Virgo detector; and some 70 ground- and space-based observatories.

KICC people are actively involved in the LIGO collaboration.

Further Information

KICC Annual Report 2018

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